Walking and Talking With My Pumpkin Vine

Video camera in hand, I walked the garden last night, taking traveling shots of the pumpkin vine. That’s my cat, Slinky, at the start of the video who is always glad to find me in the garden.  I look forward to seeing  her sweet little face peering around the corner.

It’s been an exciting year in our pumpkin patch, thanks to a self-seeding vine in mid-April.  The vine traveled the length of the house, before shooting up the side of an arching trellis. I tied the vine with string to support the weight of some developing fruit. From there it trailed back toward the ground.  Last night I redirected the newest growth, a u-turn if you will, before it crossed the side yard and headed toward our neighbor’s fence.

Come along for the tour:

Pumpkin’s Progress in 90 Days:

Watch Me Grow

Watch Me Grow

Getting a Head Start

Getting a Head Start

Already Dwarfing the Indoor Transplants

Already Dwarfing the Indoor Transplants

Heading West

Heading West: Trellis Number One

Heading for Trellis Number Two

Heading for Trellis Number Two

Up, Over and Down Trellis Number Three

Up, Over and Down Trellis Number Three

Hanging on By a Thread

Hanging on By a Thread

12 thoughts on “Walking and Talking With My Pumpkin Vine

  1. Aargh, I can’t get the video to load! I’ve such a wonderful Bulgarian countryside Internet connection – not! I will keep trying. Your pumpkins are so tidy, mine just sort of, sprawl!

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    • Sorry to hear about the slow Internet connection. That must be stressful. I’ve encouraged the pumpkins to grow away from the grass by gently lifting up the vines every few days. If I had more room, as you no doubt have, I think I would let them sprawl as well.

      Bulgarian countryside sounds like a gardener’s dream.

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  2. Wowee-Kazowee, Alys that pumpkin vine is a riot, do you only grow them once a year like we do in the north? It was so fun to be in the garden with you and Slinky and take the personal tour. Now when I read your wonderful comments I’ll be hearing you too, awesome!

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    • Thank you, Boomdee! It felt like a two for one when I was able to capture a bit of Slinky along with the pumpkin vines.

      We grow them once a year here, too. The crops are 90 – 120 days, from seed to fruit. Once harvested, the pumpkins last many months if kept in a cool, dry place. Native Americans taught the Pilgrims about planting and harvesting them, which helped keep them from starving the second winter after arrival. If only we could have kept that nice relationship going.

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